Strength Training is Key to Effective Fat Burning Weight Loss

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Strength training such as weight lifting and other forms of resistance training have been a major pillar of health and fitness for numerous generators of humans to develop muscles and increase overall strength. Whether using resistance bands, free weights (e.g. olympic plates, dumbells, etc.), selectorized machine and other gym equipment or even using an individuals own bodyweight like push ups and pull ups, increasing your muscle mass helps prevent and counter-act age-related muscle mass loss.

It has lately gained popularity among individuals wanting to lose weight. While workouts like jogging on new or used treadmills for sale and biking are excellent at decreasing body fat, they can also reduce muscle growth, resulting in weaker muscles and higher apparent weight loss since muscle is denser than fat. However, unlike endurance workouts, data suggests that strength training using new or used gym equipment not only reduces body fat but also enhances muscle growth and strength.

While individuals workout, human muscles consume more energy than when we are at rest. The body breaks-down carbohydrates, fat, and protein that is consumed in your diet (which are stored in the muscles, liver, and adipose tissue) to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) which then fuels your muscle activity. As a result, when we exercise, we respire rapidly and our hearts work even harder to provide more oxygen, fat, and carbohydrate-rich blood to our working muscles to utilize the stored ATP fuel.

What becomes apparent, though, is that oxygen consumption remains high following individuals that have exercised in order to rebuild muscles to their resting condition by converting stored fat and carbs into the building blocks needed for muscles. It is similar to how a vehicle’s engine remains warm even after the ignition is cut-off. Excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) is the physiological effect when your body’s metabolism continues to burn more calories during a period that oxygen consumption remains heightened post workout to facilitate muscle recovery.

The type, length, and intensity of exercise, as well as fitness level and diet, influence the duration and intensity of the after-burn response. Multijoint strength training that utilize compound muscle activity where those muscles are brought to near failure produce longer EPOC effects after the workout is completed.

One of most effective methods for boosting both short and long-term after-burn are high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and high-intensity resistance training. Strength training can also help with long-term weight loss. This is because muscle mass influences your resting metabolic rate (RMR) also known as Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR), which is the total amount of energy needed to function at rest. In non-exercising individuals, basal metabolic rate contributes up to 60-75% of the overall energy consumption, and is the body's primary energy source at rest.

BMR/RMR is affected by increasing muscle development through strength training, leading to increased or persistent weight loss over time. Workouts for strength training should target the largest core muscles, be undertaken standing up, and include two or more joints. All of these factors causes the body work to harder, which improves lean muscle growth and so resting basal metabolic rate.

Excess fat loss is enhanced by strength training using used gym equipment for sale, as improves overall after-burn and lean muscle mass, so improving the volume of energy we consume at rest. When combined with an eating plan, this should expedite the shedding of surplus fat mass all while delivering additional health benefits.

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